There is a new publication entitled Improving scientific impact: How to practice science that influences environmental policy and management in Conservation Science & Practice.

This new Journal is about solution-oriented, science-based conservation. Going through the article, I clearly saw some bridges with other areas of research. The publication is co-written by Jonathan R. B. Fisher from The Pew Charitable Trusts (Washington), Stephen A. Wood from The Nature Conservancy (Connecticut), Mark A. Bradford, Yale University (Connecticut) and Thomas Rodd Kelsey from The Nature Conservancy (California).

Abstract

Scientists devote substantial time and resources to research intended to help solve environmental problems. Environmental managers and policymakers must decide how to use the best available research evidence to prioritize actions leading to desired environmental outcomes. Yet decision-makers can face barriers to using scientific evidence to inform action. They may be unaware of the evidence, lack access to it, not understand it, or view it as irrelevant. These barriers mean a valuable resource (evidence) is underused. We outline a set of practical steps for scientists who want to improve the
impact their research has on decision-making: (a) identify and understand the audience; (b) clarify the need for evidence; (c) gather “just enough” evidence; and (d) share and discuss the evidence. These are guidelines, not a strict recipe for success. But, we believe that regularly following these recommendations should increase the chance of scientific evidence being considered and used in environmental decision-making. Our goal is for this article to be accessible to anyone, rather than a comprehensive review of the topic.

Decision tree: from identifying your audience to discuss the evidence

They group their recommendations into four areas that they explain all along their article: (1) identify the audience; (2) clarify the need for evidence; (3) gather “just enough” evidence; and (4) share and discuss the evidence. They sum them up in a very well-done decision tree in two Parts.

Part A of the decision tree by Fisher and al. (2020)
Part B of the decision tree by Fisher and al. (2020)

This article will provide useful insight for scientists who want to improve the impact of their research on engagement stakeholder.

Reference (Open access)

Fisher, JRB, Wood, SA, Bradford, MA, Kelsey, TR. Improving scientific impact: How to practice science that influences environmental policy and management. Conservation Science and Practice. 2020;e0210. https://doi.org/10.1111/csp2.210